Everything Else, Food Hunter

Beef Noodle X Lunch

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Kway Teow | Sliced beef | Beef ball | Bean sprouts | Chinese parsley | Tart chilli sauce

The tenderness of the beef is always something to look forward to in a bowl of beef noodles. With a variety of cuts to choose from (triple, brisket, tendon or frank), it is hard to get tired of this dish.

Not only that, there are other parts of the beef noodle that is yummy. The soup entices me with its herbs and spices brew. Plus, the tart chilli sauce is unique of the beef noodle. Made of grated lengkuas (galangal root), squeezed lime and cincaluk (pickled shrimp), the slight sour and spicy taste helps add a different dimension to the taste and not make eating the beef too much on the stomach.

Oh my. I’m now craving for a good bowl of this again.

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Everything Else, Food Hunter

TANGS Market @ Orchard Road

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“Excuse me, are you sure you can finish two bowls?” 

That was the surprising question I got from a Caucasian man who was in the queue behind me.  One look at the food portion and I could have told him that I was able to finish both. But being polite, I told him it was for my friend and myself to have.

At $4, I was a little disappointed that my 85 Redhill Teochew Fishball Noodles was not able to fill my hungry stomach. However, the noodles had a reasonable spicy and sour taste from the chilli and vinegar sauce.  Thankfully it was just the right amount, if not it would have coated my lips in oil. The fishballs were quite springy and it came with a special mushroom / vegetable piece.

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To top off our lunch, we had Kway Guan Huat Joo Chiat Original Popiah ($4). Known as the “Poh Piah Maker to Singapore’s Presidnet and Prime Minister,” it was slightly longer than the usual ones. Wrapped with stewed turnip, radish, beansprouts and fresh lettuce, this healthy snack tasted good and each had the right portion and  crunch to it.  The poh piah skin was not too thick and doughy and it slightly soaked up a bit of the chilli, hoisin sauce and turnip stew in it.

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The fishball noodles and popiah were not the only thing found in the TANGS Market. Tucked within the kitchen and household section of TANGS, it also brings Peranakan, Penang and local delights under one roof. Like a noisy street market, the queues snaked around the narrow walkways and people were jostling through looking for seats in the small area.

The interior were furnished in old school items with an eclectic mix of bright colours and Peranakan patterns and prints. Some includes childhood favourites like the Khong Guan little biscuits with sweet star-shaped coating and Nyonya porcelain wares. While the price to the portion of food serving did not whet my appetite, I do think this newly renovated place is breathing life once again to the once quiet underground passageway towards the Orchard Road train station.

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Food Hunter

Li Xin Teochew Fishball Noodles @ Ion Orchard

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Nowadays it is hard to find handmade fishballs being sold at hawker centres or food courts. The cost efficiency and consistency of factory-made ones – although differing slightly in taste and texture – trumps tradition and it is no wonder you see many places selling that instead.

I was introduced to this by a friend and was told it was previously from Old Airport Road Food Centre (which has other famous eats!). I found it overpriced at $5 but the taste of the fresh and bouncy fishballs were a good change from the common manufactured types.

Not to forget the noodles (mee pok) that need to come with a good sauce! Their sauce was mixed with a special blend of chilli sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce, vinegar and lard. I did not find the chilli sauce too overpowering; it had the right balance and was not very oily.

On a side note, this food court gave a 10% discount to Safra and Passion card members! Plus points for that!

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Food Hunter

Traditional Teochew Wedding Favours x Thye Moh Chan

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Shuang xi – Double Happiness

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Weddings are always such joyous occasions, and what better way to celebrate them than with good food. It is rare these days for young couples to choose to give such traditional wedding favours to family and friends, but I am glad my cousin did.

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Teochew Wedding Favours

Salty Tau Sar Piah | Lar Piah | Assorted Crisps (White Sesame, Black Sesame, Pistachio, Rice Puffs, Peanut)

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Coming from a traditional Teochew family, I grew up eating Lar Piah, a kind of traditional Teochew mooncake that came way before those flaky skinned yam moon cakes we all enjoy today. It is essentially a flaky skinned mooncake (yet different from that of said yam mooncakes) baked in pig lard and filled with smooth sweet tau sar (bean paste) filling. Unhealthy, yes I heard you.

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Thye Moh Chan does the best I’ve eaten and I was a tad disappointed when the old uncle who ran the place decided to retire. Thank God for corporate chains like the good people at Breadtalk who bought the recipe and are keeping tradition going, albeit at a higher price. But what’s there to complain about if it still tastes just as good? These aren’t just wedding favours, they are also mooncakes so why not try something a little different this Mid-Autumn Festival?

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